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Crockery

So, the lawyer I work for never heard of crockery, which made me wonder where the word came from. Is it archaic? Or British?

If you know, please share--and if you don't, feel welcome to make up something outrageous!

Comments

( 11 comments — Leave a comment )
dormouse_in_tea
Aug. 13th, 2010 02:37 am (UTC)
It's archaic, 1750s it appears. used to be common parlance vs cutlery.
smoooom
Aug. 13th, 2010 02:55 am (UTC)
Actually it's dishes, plates cups saucers etc. At least in the uses I've always heard it.
dormouse_in_tea
Aug. 13th, 2010 03:07 am (UTC)
exactly.
wyld_dandelyon
Aug. 13th, 2010 05:44 am (UTC)
cutlery and crockery--that makes sense.
smoooom
Aug. 13th, 2010 02:52 am (UTC)
It is as far as I know a british term. It gets a lot of use over here both in Canada and the US but not every one knows it. I have no idea where it comes from. I just know when to use it (G)
wyld_dandelyon
Aug. 13th, 2010 05:49 am (UTC)
Grinning back at you!
dsgood
Aug. 13th, 2010 05:01 am (UTC)
Maybe more than you wanted to know
From the Online Etymology Dictionary http://etymonline.com:

crockery "earthen vessels collectively," 1719 (in crockery-ware); see crock + -ery.

crock O.E. crocc, crocca "pot, vessel," from P.Gmc. *krogu "pitcher, pot" (cf. O.Fris. krocha "pot," O.S. kruka, M.Du. cruke, Du. kruik, O.H.G. kruog "pitcher," Ger. Krug, O.N. krukka "pot"). Perhaps from the same source as M.Ir. crocan "pot," Gk. krossos "pitcher," O.C.S. krugla "cup." Used as an image of worthless rubbish since 19c., perhaps from the use of crockery as chamberpots.

wyld_dandelyon
Aug. 13th, 2010 05:43 am (UTC)
Re: Maybe more than you wanted to know
LOL! The internets are wonderful. Thank you.

Definitely archaic, then, at least here in the states.
dianavilliers
Aug. 13th, 2010 08:33 am (UTC)
It's in current use here, meaning basically ceramic tableware.
valdary
Aug. 13th, 2010 09:40 am (UTC)
Crockery is in common use in Britain, though I notice we don't use the word as frequently as we did when I was younger. I would expect a teenager to know the word but not to use it.
beige_alert
Aug. 14th, 2010 02:27 am (UTC)
Native speaker of English? From the US? I mean, it's not a word most of us use too often, but to not know it at all seems odd.
( 11 comments — Leave a comment )

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